Winston Churchill called Helen Keller “The greatest woman of our age.” We celebrate her achievements. Her thirst for knowledge, experiences and hard-earned success inspire all of us to be lifelong learners and advocates for ourselves and others.

Helen Keller smelling a rose
Photo Credit: The Helen Keller Foundation

Access to Employment Support Services for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Who Want to Work
 
search icon
GO

In Recognition of Helen Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968)

Jun 22, 2016

This month, on the anniversary of her birth, we honor Helen Keller. As a young child, Helen Keller contracted a fever that left her deaf and blind. Despite these challenges, she worked tirelessly to learn to communicate with the sighted and hearing world.  She wanted to obtain an education and achieved this goal, becoming the first deaf and blind person to graduate from college.  Helen later became a successful author, lecturer, social activist and advocate for people with disabilities.  She is a symbol of hope, courage and perseverance.

Winston Churchill called Helen Keller “The greatest woman of our age.” We celebrate her achievements. Her thirst for knowledge, experiences and hard-earned success inspire all of us to be lifelong learners and advocates for ourselves and others.

If you’re inspired by Helen Keller’s achievements and would like help to achieve your work goals, contact the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 (V) or 866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET. Ask an agent to send you a list of service providers, including those that specialize in serving people with visual or hearing impairments, or find providers on your own with the Ticket to Work Find Help tool. For more information about Social Security’s Ticket to Work program, visit www.choosework.net.

To learn more about Helen Keller’s life and work, please visit the Helen Keller Foundation.

Helen Keller smelling a rose
Photo Credit:  The Helen Keller Foundation

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people age 18 through 64 who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSI or SSDI) and who want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. It helps people with disabilities move toward financial independence and connects them with the services and support they need to succeed in the workforce. Social Security has special rules for persons who are blind.  Read more about the rules here: https://www.ssa.gov/redbook/eng/blindrules.htm.

Additional Resources:

Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults
Helen Keller Services
Helen Keller Services for the Blind
Video: Finding Your Way to Employment with Ticket to Work – a new video series presented in American Sign Language