ADA at 30 logoApproximately 1 in 3 Social Security disability beneficiaries has a mental illness. For many coping with a mental illness, finding a job is not easy. We're celebrating 30 years since the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). Today, we answer the question: How are people with mental illness protected against discrimination in the workplace?

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#ADAat30: How the Americans with Disabilities Act Protects People with Mental Illness

Jun 18, 2020

ADA at 30 logoIn honor of the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we're revisiting one of our most popular blog posts.

Approximately 1 in 3 Social Security disability beneficiaries has a mental illness. For many coping with a mental illness, finding a job is not easy and commonly takes more than one attempt. Fortunately, for people who receive Social Security disability benefits, Work Incentives, like Expedited Reinstatement can help.   

This year, we're celebrating 30 years since the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). Today we answer the question: How are people with mental illness protected against discrimination in the workplace?

One key feature of the ADA prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in all aspects of employment, including pay, promotion, hiring, and firing. Employers and potential employers are not allowed to treat employees or candidates with disabilities differently than other employees or job candidates. As long as you can complete the essential tasks of the job, you should be considered equally among other candidates. Learn about what you can do if you feel you've been discriminated against in our blog, The EEOC and Discrimination.

The ADA also requires employers to provide reasonable workplace accommodations for employees with disabilities and to job candidates during the interview process.

Reasonable accommodations are changes to a job, workplace, or the way a job is carried out that allow an employee with a disability to perform a job for which they are qualified. Examples of reasonable accommodations for people with a mental illness could include a flexible schedule, allowing the use of headphones during work to reduce stress, or a more private workspace.

To learn more, read our original post How the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Protects People with Mental Illness.

Want to learn more?

Looking for a job can be stressful, but work can have a positive effect on your mental health. Join us on June 24 from 3-4:30 p.m. ET for our next Work Incentive Seminar Event (WISE) webinar, Ticket to Work and Mental Health, and learn how a Ticket to Work service provider can help.

Register now!

Social Security's Ticket to Work (Ticket) program has helped people with mental illnesses find the services and support they need to reach financial independence. Read the Success Stories of CherieJohnny and Brenda, who have managed their mental illnesses, and taken advantage of the Ticket program and other Work Incentives.

The Ticket program can help people with mental illness create a path to a better financial future. If you or someone you know is receiving disability benefits and wants to work, the Ticket program has the resources, supports and services to help you pursue and reach career goals. Call 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) to talk to a customer service representative about your situation, and how the Ticket program can help you.

The Ticket program can help people with mental illness create a path to a better financial future. If you or someone you know is receiving disability benefits and wants to work, the Ticket program has the resources, supports and services to help you pursue and reach career goals. Call 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) to talk to a customer service representative about your situation, and how the Ticket program can help you.

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