Woman sleepingNearly one-third of all American adults report getting less than the recommended amount of sleep. According to the CDC, it's a major public health concern. And if you are on the job or preparing to enter the workforce, it can also affect how well you think, react, work, learn and get along with others. Read today's blog for tips on how to create healthy sleep habits.

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Why Sleep Matters

Mar 18, 2021

Woman sleepingNearly one-third of all American adults report getting less than the recommended amount of sleep[1]. Are you one of them?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, not getting enough sleep is a major public health concern. For example, ongoing sleep deficiency can raise your risk for some chronic health problems such as diabetes or depression. If you are on the job or preparing to enter the workforce, it can also affect how well you think, react, work, learn and get along with others.

This week in honor of National Sleep Awareness Week, the Ticket to Work Program is sharing why sleep is important for job performance, and what you can do to practice healthy sleep habits. Below are several facts about sleep to keep in mind.

Have trouble falling asleep?

Having a bedroom that is conducive to falling asleep and staying asleep is an important factor in creating healthy sleep habits. The Sleep Foundation sorts the elements needed for a good sleep setting into two categories:

Category One: Design Choices

Interior design is about making a place your home and expressing your style, but it can also help create a bedroom that promotes better sleep habits.

  • Choose colors that help you feel calm and relaxed. For many that means warm, softer colors.
  • Make sure the layout is usable without feeling cramped. Keep your bedroom essentials but make sure there is still space to move about comfortably.
  • Reduce the clutter in the bedroom. Clutter may reinforce the idea of "too many loose ends," creating a sense of anxiety or stress. Keeping your bedroom neat and organized can help set you up for a successful workday and restful night.

Category Two: Practical Environment Changes

A sleep-conducive bedroom doesn't just look relaxing, it has some practical characteristics that support your body's natural ability to wind down and fall asleep.

  • Reduce light and noise in the bedroom when it's time for sleep. A dark, quiet bedroom supports your circadian rhythm's cues to your body that it's time to sleep. This also means you should reduce your exposure to electronics and blue light, which can throw off your circadian rhythm.
  • Keep your bedroom at a comfortable temperature, usually between 60 to 71 degrees Fahrenheit. Excess heat can disrupt sleep.
  • Your mattress and bedding play an important role in helping you fall and stay asleep. Make sure each is comfortable to your personal preference but can support your back and neck properly based on your sleep position. Regular washing of all bedding also helps keep the bed fresh and reduces potential allergen build-up.  

Set yourself up for a successful night's sleep by making your bedroom a place of relaxation and comfort. And if you've got a big day ahead, set aside some time for "active worrying." Make a plan or write down a to-do list or journal. Writing lists can ease worry and reduce stress, making it easier to fall asleep. Getting enough sleep can help you stay focused and ready to achieve your work goals.

About Ticket to Work

There's a lot to consider when job searching, and it can be tough trying to do everything on your own. Social Security's Ticket to Work (Ticket) Program supports career development for people ages 18 through 64 who receive Social Security disability benefits (SDSI or SSI) and want to work. The Ticket Program is free and voluntary. The Ticket Program connects you with free employment services to help you decide if working is right for you, prepare for work, find a job or maintain success while you are working.

Learn more

To learn more about the Ticket Program, visit choosework.ssa.gov or call the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers or find providers on your own with the Ticket Program Find Help tool.

Learn more

To learn more about the Ticket Program, visit choosework.ssa.gov or call the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers or find providers on your own with the Ticket Program Find Help tool.

Receive Ticket Program Texts

If you're interested in receiving text messages from the Ticket Program, please text TICKET to 474747. Standard messaging rates may apply. We'll send updates from our blog, identify steps on the path to employment and more. We hope you'll find this new way to stay in touch helpful. You can opt out at any time.

If you're interested in receiving text messages from the Ticket Program, please text TICKET to 474747. Standard messaging rates may apply. We'll send updates from our blog, identify steps on the path to employment and more. We hope you'll find this new way to stay in touch helpful. You can opt out at any time.


[1] CDC - Sleep Home Page - Sleep and Sleep Disorders

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