No matter what job or career you have in mind, young people need strong communication and networking skills to succeed in the workplace. Reaching out to a service provider through Social Security’s Ticket to Work program is a good first step. 

Access to Employment Support Services for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Who Want to Work
 
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Networking and Communication Skills for Young People

Jul 7, 2016

When it comes to preparing for the future, especially getting a job, there’s a lot for young people to think about:

  • Where would you like to work and what can you see yourself doing every day?
  • What kinds of people skills do you need to do well at work?
  • Who can help when you have questions about finding a job or improving your skills?

No matter what job or career you have in mind, young people need strong communication and networking skills to succeed in the workplace. Reaching out to a service provider through Social Security’s Ticket to Work program is a good first step. Through the Ticket to Work program, you can find an Employment Network or State Vocational Rehabilitation provider who can help you answer these questions, set employment goals, and help you find work. They can help with resume writing, interview practice, and developing the communication skills you need to transition from school to work.

Social Security’s Ticket to Work program supports career development for people age 18 through 64 who get Social Security disability benefits (SSI or SSDI) and want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. It helps people with disabilities move toward financial independence and connects them with the services and support they need to succeed in the workforce.

Networking matters 

Whether you are looking for a job or want advice about work, one of the most useful tools is having a strong network. That means having people you can talk to or email about work options. Your network can include friends, family members, teachers, counselors, school administrators, volunteer coordinators, employers, mentors, case managers and others. It’s important to let the people in your life know about your goals and interests so they can help you find work or connect you to others who can.

Communicate effectivelyImage reading "Networking and Communications Matter" along with a list of thoughts and tips

Common-sense communication skills will help you succeed in any job. These “soft skills” include active listening, managing conflict, negotiation, teamwork, decision making, problem solving, stress management, planning, and time management. Ticket to Work service providers can help you develop these skills and teach you about networking as you begin your journey toward employment.

If you’re ready to explore the possibility of finding work, contact the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 (Voice) or 866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers. You can also search for providers online using the Find Help tool. For more information about Social Security’s Ticket to Work program, visit www.choosework.net.