Graphic of a check list and a pencilDuring a job interview, asking questions can help you learn more about a company or a job position and show your interest in the position. Today's blog post helps you plan your questions and suggests what you may want to ask during your next job interview.

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Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Access to Employment Support Services for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Who Want to Work
 
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It’s Your Turn: Questions to Ask During a Job Interview

Sep 21, 2017

Graphic of a check list and a pencilOnce you've impressed an employer with your resume and phone interview, you may be asked to meet an employer in person. An in-person interview is an opportunity for a potential employer to get to know you and find out if you'd be a good fit for the company.

Sometimes, we forget that job interviews are a two-way street. Just as the employer wants to make sure they're making a good choice when they hire you, it is just as important for you to be sure that the company is a good match for you. Researching a company before an interview will give you some of that information, but an interview will also help you decide whether you would be happy and productive working there.

The interview is also your opportunity to show interest in the job. Interviewers want to know that you care enough about the position and their company to ask questions. At some point, probably near the end of the interview, an interviewer will ask if you have any questions. However, you don't always have to wait for that opening. Asking questions during an interview can make a discussion more interesting.

Planning your questions

Your questions should focus on understanding what the employer is looking for in an employee and how your skills can help the company. In short, focus on what you can do for them rather than what they can do for you. Stay away from questions about salary and benefits at this point. You will have time to talk about that when they offer you the job.

You don't need a lot of questions. Prepare 4 or 5 that you think will give you more insight about whether the job is right for you. You can even write them down so that you don't forget. Here are a few questions to consider including on your list:

  • What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to do their best in this role?
  • How would you describe a typical day and week in this position?
  • What's the most important thing I can accomplish in the first 60 days?
  • What are the biggest challenges facing the company right now?
  • What do you like best about working for this company?
  • What are the next steps in the hiring process?

Remember, whether you're answering questions or asking them, being prepared is the best way to show you're serious about the job and help you stand out from the crowd.

Disclosure and accommodations

Disclosure of your disability is always your choice. If you need a reasonable accommodation for your interview, you may need to disclose your disability. But if you do not request an accommodation for the interview, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) does not require you to tell the interviewer about your disability or that you may need a reasonable accommodation to perform the job. Learn more about disclosure on our blog and head to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) website for more information about the ADA.

About Ticket to Work

Social Security's Ticket to Work (Ticket) program supports career development for people ages 18 through 64 who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSI or SSDI) and want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. It helps people with disabilities move toward financial independence and connects them with the services and support they need to succeed in the workforce.

Learn more

To learn more about the Ticket program, visit www.ssa.gov/work. You can also call the Ticket to Work Help Line at 866-968-7842 or 866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers or find providers on your own with the Ticket program Find Help tool.