On July 26, 1990, President Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into law. The ADA ensures equal access to businesses, employment, transportation, telecommunications, and government programs and services for people with disabilities.

Image of President George H.W. Bush signing the Americans with Disabilities Act

Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Ticket to Work logo and The Seal of the United States Social Security Administration
Access to Employment Support Services for Social Security Disability Beneficiaries Who Want to Work
 
search icon
GO

Celebrating the Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act

Jul 14, 2016

About Ticket to Work

Social Security's Ticket to Work program supports career development for people ages 18 through 64 who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSI or SSDI) and want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. It helps people with disabilities move toward financial independence and connects them with the services and support they need to succeed in the workforce.

Learn more

To learn more about Ticket Work, contact the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 (Voice) or 866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. ET. Ask an agent to send you a list of service providers. You can also find providers on your own with the Ticket to Work Find Help tool.

“Many of our fellow citizens with disabilities are unemployed. They want to work, and they can work, and this is a tremendous pool of people. And remember, this is a tremendous pool of people who will bring to jobs diversity, loyalty, proven low turnover rate, and only one request: the chance to prove themselves. When given the opportunity to be independent, they will move proudly into the economic mainstream of American life, and that's what this legislation is all about.” – President George H.W. Bush, on signing the Americans with Disabilities Act.

On July 26, 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into law. The ADA ensures equal access to businesses, employment, transportation, telecommunications, and government programs and services for people with disabilities. The law also gives civil rights protections to people with disabilities — similar to the protections based on race, color, sex, national origin, age and religion.

Image of President George H.W. Bush signing the Americans with Disabilities Act

The ADA has reduced barriers for and changed perceptions of Americans with disabilities. Thanks to the ADA, many companies now recruit, hire and promote people with disabilities. The law has helped many people with disabilities enter the workforce, but there is more to be done. The U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy reports that only 20.5 percent of people with disabilities in this country are working. That's compared to 68.4 percent of people without disabilities.

Another effort to help people with disabilities enter the workforce is Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Section 503 requires federal contractors and subcontractors (companies doing business with the federal government) to recruit, hire, train and promote people with disabilities. If you are age 18 through 64, receiving Social Security disability benefits, and services from an Employment Network or your state Vocational Rehabilitation agency, the Ticket to Work program can connect you to federal contractors and subcontractors seeking new talent. If you’re ready to work, call the Ticket to Work Helpline at 1-866-968-7842 (V) or 866-833-2967 (TTY) and ask about the Ticket to Work Virtual Job Fair.