Ben shaking hands with a service providerWhether you're applying for a job or you've started working, understanding and requesting reasonable accommodations could help you on the path to financial independence through work. Learn how a Ticket to Work Employment Network can help your request workplace accommodations for employment success.

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Reasonable Accommodations? An EN Can Help!

Jul 30, 2019

Ben shaking hands with an ENYou're ready to look for work. You feel great about how your resume has turned out. You have several cover letters ready for job openings that you and your Ticket to Work Employment Network (EN) have found. But you still have questions and concerns about whether you can manage work with your disability.

You have heard about reasonable accommodations, but you're not really sure how to approach an employer to request and receive accommodations. Fortunately, many ENs provide supports and services to make the process of disclosing your disability and requesting accommodations more manageable. Let's take a look at how.

What are reasonable accommodations?

When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in July 1990, it established a requirement for employers to provide reasonable accommodations so that people with disabilities could access the same employment opportunities and benefits of employment as individuals without disabilities. Reasonable accommodations are changes to a hiring process or workplace, or changes to the way a job is performed that allow a qualified jobseeker or employee with a disability to access equal employment opportunities.

Accommodations can cover a variety of changes — whether it's access to specific technology, flexibility for an employee's schedule, reassigning non-essential job functions to someone else or another option that you can discuss with an employer.

Your EN and reasonable accommodations

ENs can provide help requesting and receiving accommodations:

Deciding to disclose: To request and receive a reasonable accommodation, you'll need to disclose your disability to the employer. This is your decision. However, your EN answer any questions you may have and help you make the choice that's right for you.

Submitting your request: Requesting an accommodation isn’t always a formal process, but your EN can still help guide you through it. Although it’s not necessary, the Job Accommodation Network (JAN) recommends submitting your disclosure and request for accommodation in writing to create a record of your request. Not sure what to write? Your EN can help make sure you include the needed information.

Negotiating accommodations: Potential employers and employers are not required to provide the exact accommodation you request if another option will still let you successfully perform a task. For example, if you are blind or have low vision, you may request to have an assistant read a written test to you for the job application process. However, the potential employer can decide that they'll provide you a recording of the test. If an accommodation offered doesn't adequately address your need and you're not sure what you should do, your EN can suggest how you can talk with your employer to advocate for the accommodations you had proposed. They may also help you consider other accommodation options that you can suggest to the employer.

More resources

Looking for more information about reasonable accommodations and the ADA? Check out:

Ticket to Work

Social Security's Ticket to Work (Ticket) program supports career development for people ages 18 through 64 who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSI or SSDI) and want to work. The Ticket program is free and voluntary. It helps people with disabilities move toward financial independence and connects them with the services and support they need to succeed in the workforce.

Learn more

To learn more about the Ticket program, call the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers or find providers on your own with the Ticket program Find Help tool.

Learn more

To learn more about the Ticket program, call the Ticket to Work Help Line at 1-866-968-7842 or 1-866-833-2967 (TTY) Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET. Ask a representative to send you a list of service providers or find providers on your own with the Ticket program Find Help tool.

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